Can I get a work visa after completing an MiM?


In terms of studying abroad, is it easy to get a work visa after I finish a Master in Management program?
In terms of studying abroad, is it easy to get a work visa after I finish a Master in Management program?
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This depends largely on the country in which you study. Generally in Europe, student visas can be converted to post-study work visas that let students work for a fixed period of time while job searching. This is the case in France, Germany and the Netherlands. The UK has just announced plans to bring back a two-year post-study work visa. China has one, as does Canada and Australia. The US has the Optional Practical Training program, granting students 12 months of work time once they leave school. It can be extended for graduates of STEM-focused programs that help to address a skills crunch.

However, some countries require that a minimum amount of time is spent studying before a post-study work visa can be acquired, such as Australia. Not all MiMs meet this requirement. So graduates will need to do their research.

Once a job is secured, students in most countries can apply for a semi-permanent work permit. But this is more difficult in some countries like Spain, where companies have to prove they were unable to find a suitable local candidate for the job. In the US, the work visa process acts like a lottery, with a limited number of visas being granted to a small number of the hundreds of thousands of applicants each year.

In the majority of nations, a work permit leads to permanent residency after a few years.
This depends largely on the country in which you study. Generally in Europe, student visas can be converted to post-study work visas that let students work for a fixed period of time while job searching. This is the case in France, Germany and the Netherlands. The UK has just announced plans to bring back a two-year post-study work visa. China has one, as does Canada and Australia. The US has the Optional Practical Training program, granting students 12 months of work time once they leave school. It can be extended for graduates of STEM-focused programs that help to address a skills crunch.

However, some countries require that a minimum amount of time is spent studying before a post-study work visa can be acquired, such as Australia. Not all MiMs meet this requirement. So graduates will need to do their research.

Once a job is secured, students in most countries can apply for a semi-permanent work permit. But this is more difficult in some countries like Spain, where companies have to prove they were unable to find a suitable local candidate for the job. In the US, the work visa process acts like a lottery, with a limited number of visas being granted to a small number of the hundreds of thousands of applicants each year.

In the majority of nations, a work permit leads to permanent residency after a few years.
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